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Table 3 Section 2: Structural points, key issue 2: CT type

From: European Society of Emergency Radiology: guideline on radiological polytrauma imaging and service (short version)

Key question: Which computer tomography technology is needed for a polytrauma service?
No Statement(s) Cons Grade Cons
2.2.1 Trauma Centres of the highest level of medical care should be equipped with a Multi-detector CT (MDCT) offering at least 64 simultaneous slices 100%
strong
GoR
A
86%
normal
2.2.2 As isotropic scanning offers the advantages of high quality MPR (multiplanar reformations), a CT scanner ought to be preferred with at least 16 detector rows 86%
normal
GPP
B
86%
normal
2.2.3 The computer tomographs ought to be equipped with current techniques for the reduction of radiation exposure, but this should not delay image reconstructions 100%
strong
GoR
B
86%
normal
2.2.4 Dual-Energy/ Spectral imaging/ substraction imaging scanner may be considered 86%
normal
GPP
0
71%
weak
2.2.5 Trauma centres of the highest level of medical care should be technically equipped to a standard that will allow a perfusion CT of the brain 100%
strong
GPP
A
100%
strong
2.2.6 Trauma centres of the highest level of medical care should be technically equipped to a standard that will allow a cardiac CT, if needed 14%
none
- -
Literature: detected = 615, excluded = 579, full-text: rated = 36, excluded = 28, included = 8 (guideline: [15, 24]; level 2: [25]; level 3: [26,27,28,29,30])
Comments: As the technological development was fast in the last decade (the interval for literature inclusion), literature included reports on four row CT-scanners for polytrauma service. The consensus conference states them as obsolete