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Table 1 Recommended imaging range and ECG synchronisation depending on the congenital heart disease type

From: Technical principles of computed tomography in patients with congenital heart disease

Congenital heart disease type Imaging range ECG synchronisation required? Comment
Aortic coarctation Aortic arch to diaphragm No Thin collimation is recommended for identification of collateral pathways
Anomalous pulmonary venous return Aortic arch to diaphragm No Imaging range should be extended to the level of the kidneys in the infracardiac type
Patent ductus arteriosus Aortic arch to diaphragm No Thin collimation is recommended for identification of small ductus arteriosus
Persistent superior left vena cava Aortic arch to diaphragm No
Atrial septal defect Below tracheal bifurcation to diaphragm Yes ECG synchronisation may be beneficial for small intracardiac shunts
Ventricular septal defect Below tracheal bifurcation to diaphragm Yes ECG synchronisation may be beneficial for small intracardiac shunts
Tetralogy of Fallot Above the pulmonary bifurcation to diaphragm No
Common aortic-pulmonary trunk Above the pulmonary bifurcation to diaphragm No
Transposition of the great arteries Above the pulmonary bifurcation to diaphragm No
Univentricular heart Below tracheal bifurcation to diaphragm No No saline chasing bolus should be used to avoid wash-out
Double outlet ventricle Above pulmonary bifurcation to diaphragm No No saline chasing bolus should be used to avoid wash-out
Isomerism Below tracheal bifurcation to diaphragm Yes ECG synchronisation is recommended for morphological identification of the atrial appendages to determine sideness; the imaging range must include the thorax and spleen for identification of extracardiac abnormalities
Coronary artery anomaly Below tracheal bifurcation to diaphragm Yes Thin collimation and ECG synchronisation are mandatory